5 Ways to deal with parent favoritism

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parent favourism

Have you lately found that you son or daughter spends more time with your partner and wants to do stuff only with them? Do you feel like you are now becoming second choice in terms of being a parent?
If your child has been favoring either parent there is nothing to be worried about. It is a very normal and common issue faced in families.
Every parent wants to be loved and in a understanding and supportive relationship with their child. If it is an occasional issue then it is best ignored. But if this favoritism continues on a daily basis then you might want to get your relationship with your child back in track.

Here are 5 ways to deal with parent favoritism:

1)    Be empathetic

You might not like the fact that your child is asking or calling for your partner. Even if you don’t like to you should validate his request. It is important for your child to feel that he is heard.

parent love

2)    Each parent should strike balance of work and fun

In most homes it is the mother who brushes, bathes and feeds the child and then the father gets all the play time with the child. The child should not feel as if one parent is the one he or she can turn to for a treat and the other for a lesson on discipline. It becomes important to strike a balance so that the child does not look forward to only the fun parent.

3)    Never respond in a negative manner

If you child is asking for your partner then never respond in a negative manner. No matter how dejected or rejected you feel you should keep a straight face for your child. It’s not that your child doesn’t want you; it’s just a momentary phase.
parent favouritism
4)    Love your child and respect  his/her decision

Your child might like your partner more but that doesn’t mean you stop showing your unconditional love and support to your child. It is important to love no matter what.

5)    Formulate a predictable schedule

If you see that there is a struggle in who performs what activities then you can maintain a schedule where on alternate days you and your partner can do these activities with the child. Your child will soon learn to predict who’s turn it is to do the activity that can range from bathing to playing or even feeding at snack time.

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